Author Topic: DIY ledge fabric experiments  (Read 565 times)

Jasper.Younger

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DIY ledge fabric experiments
« on: September 09, 2020, 11:07:36 PM »
I'm interested in making a couple of different styles of coverings for the same ledge. If I can get my hands on a diy ledge..

The first type will be for camping in summer, 2-3 layers of 1 oz monolite ripstop for the bed hammockers seem to like this mesh because it's well, mesh. My hope would be that it wouldn't just rip straight away if it's layered up, I'd make it out of a white mesh so you can see any debris/objects that could put a hole through it.     The fly will be white noseeum mesh, nothing special but probably very breathable

The other bed and fly I would try to make in the ultralight style DCF (dyneema sandwiched) fabric 2.9oz for the bed 5oz for reinforcement points where there's more wear or stress.   And for the fly it would be 1oz where it faces away from the wall and 2.9 where the fly can make contact.

Another thought I've had is for the suspension adjustment.   I will try and make them out of 5 or 6mm amsteel whoopie slings.

I'm fully prepared for all of this to fail miserably and to go back to a conventional 600d ripstop bed and fly.

Let me know what you think.

Deuce

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Re: DIY ledge fabric experiments
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2020, 01:49:58 AM »
all sounds good. Hope to create a new WIKI for all this info.  stay posted.

Deuce

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Re: DIY ledge fabric experiments
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2020, 07:15:32 PM »
Wiki actually probably too cumbersome, will stick with this Simple Machines forum.

Open to suggestions.  Pretty much every conceivable portaledge detail is covered in Bigwalls.net, the old big walls forum (link in “news“ top right) when not signed in, and on bigwallgear.com where I have posted some design journals.

I would like to create a page that goes through the building process step by step, but need some help on where people would like to start.  Seems like working out the frame is first step.  I will make joiners available to home builders, so tube sizes need to be known. 

Maybe to get started you guys can tell me what steps you see as the process, and I can fill in details.

Jasper.Younger

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Re: DIY ledge fabric experiments
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2020, 02:51:40 AM »
Personally I don't want to source a tube bender or tubing, I'd like to buy a tube and joiner kit from you or whomever supplies them and go about making the bed fly and suspension myself.

I'm assuming with the slightly tapered frames you'll only need bed tensioners at one end of the ledge.    In the pictures on bigwalls.net it looks like a fairly simple triangle patch but some diagrams on the shape and stitching patterns for sewing the webbing reinforcement patches and associated hardware to the bed would be helpful.

Another thing I'm wondering is if you should aim for a tight bed or a slack one, I imagine the larger the angle (closer to flat) the bed fabric is the higher the force is on the ledge, particularly the long side.  What angle and tension are you aiming for? and also what's comfortable?

Deuce

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Re: DIY ledge fabric experiments
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2020, 06:46:52 PM »
Good questions.  The easiest way to pattern the bed is to draw the frame on the fabric.  Mark your sleeves and curves around joiners, etc, and cut out.   Then do ONE SIDE sleeve only.  Then assemble on frame and then decide tension for bed--you want it tight of course, but not too tight to make assembly and disassembly impossible.

The tension has to be adjustable because the fabric shrinks and expands with use.  For example, Fish does not use bed tensioners--bed tensioners on portaledges was an A5 invention about 1987.  Fish shows a 1-minute take down of his ledge on his site--that's fine sometimes, but after the ledge has gotten soaked then dried out in a storm, the fabric will be tight as a drum and the ledge is literal hell to dis-assemble.  Or the fabric has gotten stretched out, and no longer offers suitable support.  So there needs to be tension adjustability.

We made our first A5 singles with tensioners only on one side--but it didn't work as both ends needed to be de-tensioned.  With this new D4 concept of delta (tapered) shaped frames, the single-end tensioner becomes valid.

keep the questions coming.

Cheers