Author Topic: Stabilising for trees  (Read 51 times)

Ata

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Stabilising for trees
« on: September 20, 2020, 05:05:00 AM »
Hello all!

I've come across a small issue with portaledges in trees when trying to stabilise the ledge against the tree in wind. Stabilising requires tying ropes to the corners of a ledge and around the tree, however doing this prevents the fly from fully covering the ledge and allows water to get in if it's raining. I've tried to diagram this to make it clearer, see the attachment.

So I've been trying to come up with ways to build stabilising points into the ledge during building to prevent this from happening. The trick has been to ensure that in attaching stabilising straps, other points on the ledge aren't weakened.

Please critique my ideas and suggest any alternatives, I would be grateful for any input!! See attachments for diagrams. :)

Thanks!
Ata

BuffaloBrad

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Re: Stabilising for trees
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2020, 05:22:13 AM »
To drive home this issue (three).
1) Wind, obvious  very unprotected up in trees.
2) Rain issue, traditional method to tie directing from frame to around the trunk doesn't allow the fly to seal underneath the portaledge base.
3) Trees are round objects.. portaledges are square.. and can therefore "roll" extremely easily!! Cliffs/ rocks being fairly flat offer a good support for a portaledge frame - no need for stabilising or fixing a frame.

BuffaloBrad

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Re: Stabilising for trees
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2020, 05:52:21 AM »
This first method here doesn't pull on the portaledges fabric (Good thing). Depending on where the ring is located, this method mighten allow enough of a tuck-under for the fly to be effective..

Another method is "fixed" loop stitched into the ledges underside, mid fabric. This will allow full tuck of the fly.
However, places force on the fabric - issue? likely..
If stitched into the suspension straps not the underside fabric, this will be better. Although impacts the ledges comfort - these maybe felt in your back like some spreader bars.

Photo below shows this thought. Also shows "open" loop, not a good thing (not recommended) like ripping a daisy chain in the middle!
« Last Edit: September 20, 2020, 05:55:35 AM by BuffaloBrad »

Ata

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Re: Stabilising for trees
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2020, 04:22:46 PM »
Yeah, I suppose there is no avoiding that the strain is going to go somewhere on the ledge of course - I think it's best to exert it on the frame as opposed to stitching into the bed base. Eventually that will fail and then that will mean replacing the whole bed base - not ideal. A benefit of the strap system above is that it is replaceable because it's a stand-alone system.

Closer to the corners of the frame should reduce the potential for bending of the long side. Could even have the stabilising strap wrapped on the corner as in the drawing below to split the force somewhat.

In terms of the rings preventing adequate tucking of the fly fabric - they could be anchored to the frame in such a way as to allow more tuck... I've tried to draw this but it's still early and coffee is still kicking in so I hope it's clear enough. :)

Thanks for the input!

Deuce

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Re: Stabilising for trees
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2020, 04:46:01 PM »
Yes, this is very important.  I only found out myself when I spent two nights in a wicked wind, hail, rainstorm in Sumac.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVjIq5Kszbc

I recommend modifying any existing portaledge per Atalays's info above. Ideally webbing fixed around part of the frame. 

 In Australia, you can buy a speedy stitcher from Adelaide Leather  (adelaideleather.com)  A speedy stitcher is an essential expedition tool, you can pretty much fix anything sewn with it (backpack straps, etc).  Pic in Activist fly info attached.